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neonem  I don't understand the last part of this question stem though... if the mother's TSH *increases* during pregnancy? Wouldn't this further increase her (and/or the fetus's) production of T4 and thus counteract the hypothyroidism? +  
poojaym  @neonem no. Autoimmune hypothyroidism is a destruction of the thyroid gland, and a decrease in production of T3/T4. An increase in TSH means that there is not enough T3/T4 to inhibit TRH, and so TSH is being released to stimulate the thyroid gland. +31  
arezpr  TSH, T3, T4 and thyroglobulin cannot cross the placental barrier. +  
chamaleo  @arezpr although those hormones can't cross, the autoantibodies from Hashimoto's can +  
yotsubato  The baby has its own TSH though +  
sbryant6  TSH comes from the pituitary, and act on the thyroid. Autoantibodies attack the thyroid, so TSH doesn't work. +  
kimcharito  no goiter then? +  
lola915  I think there is no goiter because the baby's thyroid gland has not fully developed and these immunogloblulins from the mother could attack the thyroid gland leading to issues with it's development. +  


submitted by haliburton(208),
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isth si a crieclav plisan rodc cosient. eth ecutean silucsacuf si nttcia )UE( aitvobnri nda rpiinrotep,copo but teh ihtwe nscoeti si eht lrgacei sacfslcuui LE)( nad si emaadg.d I hitkn the aareltl oonrtip thta si neuvne si just ran.atttu/ifrlcaa

arezpr  thorax section +3  
guillo12  How do you know the gracile fasciculus is damage?!?! +2  
cr  which parte of the image its damage?, the pink? or black? +  
usmile1  the pink park yes +2  
d_holles  If you look at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gracile_fasciculus#/media/File:Spinal_cord_tracts_-_English.svg you can see that the closer to the center = legs, while further away = arms. +3  
hyperfukus  i still don't see where the damage is lol! FML +  
hyperfukus  i finally figured it out lol that was a slow moment i hope im not this slow on step yikes! +  
angelaq11  @hyperfukus I had the same problem at first, marked it and then came back. If you remember, in the spinal cord the white matter and gray matter are "reversed" compared to the brain. That said, if the butterfly shaped region (ie, the gray matter) is colored (in this case) lilac and the rest (ie, white matter) is blackish, the only thing that is actually abnormal, is the region where the dorsal columns are, because it stains just like the normal gray matter. After that, you have to think about which fasciculus is damaged, the gracilis or the cuneatus. The gracilis is medial while the cuneatus is lateral (picture someone with glued legs and open arms). Hope this helped +12  
azharhu786  Gracilus Fasciculus = Graceful legs +  
icedcoffeeislyfe  Check out FA2020 pg 508 Put simply--> myelin= black --> color of the normal white matter no myelin= pink --> color of the normal gray matter and the damaged area Dorsal columns= vibration, proprioception, pressure fine touch F. graciLis= Lower body F. cUtaneous= Upper body +2