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 +0  (nbme24#48)

risk factors include chronic pre-amputation pain, post-operative surgical pain and psychological distress.

Phantom pains often described as crushing, toes twisting, hot iron, burning, tingling, cramping, shocking, shooting, “pins & needles” Tends to localise to more distal phantom structures (e.g. fingers and toes) Prevalence in early stages 60-80% Independent of age in adults, gender, level or side of amputation

https://www.physio-pedia.com/Phantom_limb_pain

rest of choices can be ruled out


 +0  (nbme24#9)

why can't it be culex mosquito? maybe wuchereria bancrofti filariasis?





Subcomments ...

Why is it not ovarian follicle cells? I thought the female analog of Sertoli and Leydig is theca/granulosa cells.

colonelred_  Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen. +2  
brethren_md  Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +1  
sympathetikey  Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +1  
s1q3t3  Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +1  
masonkingcobra  Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +  
mcl  Wait, but did anyone mention that females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen??? +8  
mcl  But seriously though, pathology outlines says sertoli-leydig tumor "may be suspected clinically in a young patient presenting with a combination of virilization, elevated testosterone levels and ovarian / pelvic mass on imaging studies." As for follicle cell tumors, granulosa cell tumors usually occur in adults and would cause elevated levels of estrogens. Theca cell tumor would also primarily produce estrogens. Putting the links at the end since idk if they're gonna turn out right lol Link pathology outlines for sertoli leydig granulosa cell tumor theca cell tumor +5  
bigjimbo  LOL +  
fallenistand  Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen. +2  
medpsychosis  So after doing some intense research, UPtoDate, PubMed, an intense literature review on the topic I have come to the final conclusion that...... ...... ...... ...... Wait for it.... ..... ..... Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen. +2  
charcot_bouchard  Hello, i just want to add that Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +1  
giggidy  Hold up, so I'm confused - I read all the posts above but I still am unsure - are sertoli-leydig cells notorious for producing androgen? +1  
subclaviansteele  Hold the phone.....Females can get sertoli leydig cell tumors which are notorious for producing androgen? TIL TL;DR - Females can get sertoli leydig cell tumors = high androgens +  
cinnapie  I just found a recent study on PubMed saying "Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen" +  
youssefa  Hahahahaha ya'll just bored +  
water  Bored? you wouldn't think so if you knew that females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +  
nbmehelp  I dont get it +  
redvelvet  how don't you get it that females can get Sertoli Leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen? +  
drmomo  what if this means..... females can get Sertoli Leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +  


submitted by neonem(243),

Since this patient is a non-smoker, it is less to be small cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, or large cell carcinoma of the lung. Besides small cell carcinoma being from neuroendocrine origin, the one major lung cancer described by nests of well-differentiated, "regular" cells is a carcinoid tumor. Additionally, rosettes are histological features of carcinoid tumors (fun fact: rosettes also in neuroblastomas/ependymomas (in CNS), retinoblastomas, granulosa cell tumors (ovarian cancer))

mousie  When ever I hear Rosettes I always think NE tumors .... and I agree non smoking kind of RO small cell, squamous cell, or lg cell +2  
charcot_bouchard  I thought it was Hamartoma & pick chondrocyte! Can lung even have hamartoma? Pardon me it was the laast ques of whole nbme +  
drmomo  @charcot_bouchard i thought the same. uworld gave a question on coin lesion in the lungs as classically hamartoma +  


The disease here is fructose bisphosphatase deficiency. In it, IV glycerol or fructose doesn’t help because both enter the gluconeogenesis pathway below fructose bisphophatase. Galactose on the other hand enters above it. I don’t think you really need to know this to choose the correct answer since the clinical picture of fasting hypoglycemia that is corrected w/ some sort of sugar that can enter the gluconeogenesis pathway should clue you into the right answer.

neonem  I don't think you could have *totally* ruled out the other answers - I picked glycogen breakdown because it sounded kind of like Von Gierke disease (glucose-6-phosphatase) to me: characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, and hepatomegaly since you're not able to get that final step of exporting glucose into the blood. However, I guess in this case you wouldn't see that problem of glycerol/fructose infusion not increasing blood glucose. Nice catch. +8  
vshummy  I think you were super smart to catch Von Gierke! Just to refine your answer b/c I had to look this up after reading your explanation, von gierke has a problem with gluconeogenesis as well as glycogenolysis. So they’d have a problem with glycerol and fructose but also galactose since they all feed into gluconeogenesis before glucose-6-phosphatase. Great thought process! +8  
drmomo  glycerol and fructose both enter the pathway thru DHAP and glyceraldehyde-3-ph. Galactose enters thru Gal-1-ph to glu-1-ph conversion +  


submitted by m-ice(117),

Case series is a study in which the researchers present the history and treatment of a small group of similar patients, without describing any sorting into groups or randomization.

drmomo  only 3 patients +  
usmile1  uggghhh not in FA ... +  


submitted by neonem(243),

This patient has an unstable mood and a crazy relationship. She's also splitting (a defense mechanism wherein one acts like people are all-good or all-bad) as she talks about the physician and her coworkers. This characteristic is most commonly associated with borderline personality disorder. This one is in Group B ("Wild"), along with antisocial, histrionic, and narcissistic.

medskool123  i get why its borderline now (I guess I kind of always thought suicide was the biggest part of that) but can someone tell me why its not paranoid? Is it just a matter of the "better" choice? The "youre the only one i can trust" thing lead me to that. +  
drmomo  same here +  


submitted by vshummy(48),

So the best i could find was in First Aid 2019 pg 346 under Diabetic Ketoacidosis. The hyperglycemia and hyperkalemia cause an osmotic diuresis so the entire body gets depleted of fluids. Hence why part of the treatment for DKA is IV fluids. You might even rely on that piece of information alone to answer this question, that DKA is treated with IV fluids.

fulminant_life  I just dont understand how that is the cause of his altered state of consciousness. Why wouldnt altered affinity of oxygen from HbA1c be correct? A1C has a higher affinity for oxygen so wouldnt that be a better reason for him being unconscious? +3  
toupvote  HbA1c is more of a chronic process. It is a snapshot of three months. Also, people can have elevated A1c without much impact on their mental status. Other organs are affected sooner and to a greater degree than the brain. DKA is an acute issue. +1  
snafull  Can somebody please explain why 'Inability of neurons to perform glycolysis' is wrong? +1  
johnson  Probably because they're sustained on ketones. +  
doodimoodi  @snafull glucose is very high in the blood, why would neurons not be able to use it? +1  
soph  @snafull maybe u are confusing bc DK tissues are unable to use the high glucose as it is unable to enter cells but I dont think thats the case in the neurons? +  
drmomo  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2909073/ states its primarily due to acidosis along wth hyperosmolarity. so most relevant answer here would be dehydration +