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 +2  (nbme21#3)

Just a mnemonic to keep track of case control w/ odds ratio and cohort w/ relative risk. Think: Case-ContORl intentionally misspelled for odds ratio CohoRRt for relative risk





Subcomments ...

submitted by sympathetikey(251),

Inferior oblique = helps you look up & in.

Also, they said floor of the orbit, so it makes sense that the inferior muscles would damaged.

sahusema  I know you're right. I was just so uncomfortable picking an answer with "inferior rectus" because damage to the inferior rectus does nothing to explain the clinical findings of impaired upward gaze. Unless the muscle is physically stuck and can't relax or something +1  
emmy2k21  Agreed. Why would a dysfunctional inferior rectus contribute to impaired upward gaze??? I eliminated that answer choice and got it wrong :( +  
dr_jan_itor  in the last sentence it asks you to assume an "entrapment", so it is actually the inferior rectus which is the cause of the upward gaze palsy. The entrapped muscle is functionally trapped in it's shortened position, thereby not allowing the orbit to gaze upward. +2  


submitted by aesalmon(32),

Splenectomy = more susceptible to encapsulated organisms

I put E. coli as its encapsulated but that wasn't the most right answer I guess?

pippylongstock  This question is asking about the ‘S’ of FA Mnemonic for S. Pneumonia “MOPS”. Strep pneumo is the most common cause of sepsis in adults. +1  
emmy2k21  MOPS stands for meningitis, otitis, pneumonia, and SINUSITIS. It doesn't stand for sepsis. My guess as well is which is "more correct". It's about being able to identify encapsulated organisms and the spleen's role in immunity. Ha I chose E coli as well. +1  
et-tu-bromocriptine  emmy2k21 is correct, the S is for sinusitis. I was between E.coli & Strep Pneumo, but then recalled Sketchy putting the sickle on the 'encapsulated' knight in the Strep Pneumo video; Strep Pneumo is more associated with infecting sickle cell "functionally asplenic" patients. +  


submitted by yotsubato(207),

Why is this NOT chancroid? Theres nothing here that rules it out.

drachenx  Chancroid is described as an ulcer.. whilst in this question they mentioned "vesicles". Pretty much only herpes is vesicular +1  
whoissaad  They mentioned ulcers too. I chose chancroid as well, couldn't find a clue to rule it out. Also thought "discharge" was pointing you towards a bacterial infection. But guess I'm wrong :) +  
emmy2k21  I think NBME/USMLE writers make the assumption the patient is in America unless specified otherwise. Chancroid is not common in the US. If the question stem mentions a developing country, then chancroid can make your differential list. +  


don't be a dick? not really sure what more there is to it. The patient doesn't have any other family so this woman should be considered family

aesalmon  Questions like this usually hinge on asking if you're going to follow the rules or not though, obviously the one asking her to lie and say she was her sister is wrong, but the correct answer is obviously breaking the hospice center's "policy" - presumably if the physician is sending her to hospice then they don't work there so why would the Dr. be able to just tell her its fine? +  
hungrybox  Yeah, I got this one wrong with the same logic as you, aesalmon. +  
emmy2k21  I genuinely interpreted this question as though the two women were in a relationship because of the quotes "my close friend". I figured significant others would be allowed to visit simply. Ha seems like I'm the only one who read too far in between the lines! +  
dr_jan_itor  @emmy2k21 I also thought the quotes implied a lesbian relationship and that the patient was afraid to share this (they grew up at a time when it was heavily stigmatized). So i was thinking, of course you and your "special friend" can stay together. I know this is not just a phase +  
et-tu-bromocriptine  Anything particularly wrong with A (Don't worry. I'll call you right away...")? It seemed like the most professional yet considerate answer choice. Are we supposed to imply that they're partners based on those quotation marks around "close friend"? Because otherwise it seems like too casual and less professional than A, almost as if it's breaking policy. +  


submitted by hyoscyamine(19),

I know this is just a straight up fact from FA, but couldn't ureters (transitional cell carcinoma) also be correct?

hungrybox  Hmm I don't think so. The answer is "ureter" (singular) which would not result in bilateral hydronephrosis. +1  
privatejoker  If it is out of FA 2019, could someone give the page number to reference? Hydronephrosis' full definition is given on page 587 and makes no mention of invasive cervical carcinoma. +  
vinnbatmwen  p631 → Pap smear can detect cervical dysplasia before it progresses to invasive carcinoma. Diagnose via colposcopy and biopsy. Lateral invasion can block ureters - hydronephrosis - renal failure. +1  
privatejoker  Thanks! +  
emmy2k21  It's also in Pathoma page 140 in the 2018 edition! +