welcome redditors!to snoo-finity ... and beyond!
Welcome to gdupgrant's page.
Contributor score: 3
School:


Comments ...




Subcomments ...

submitted by diabetes(4),

how is adrenal medulla has ACH nicotinic receptor which are ligand-gated Na/k channeles ? muscarinic ACH receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors.

gdupgrant  epinephrine acts on alpha or beta adrenergic receptors which are all G protien receptors. muscarinic receptors are also G coupled but Acetyl choline wasnt an answer choice. In the adrenal medulla the chromaffin cells are kinda like modified post ganglionic neurons and have nicotinic receptors. +  


submitted by rainlad(1),

How do we explain the bruit in this case? Also why isn't it left artery aneurysm? That seems like it would better explain the bruit

gdupgrant  The bruit is basically just turbulent flow, which is most commonly caused by artery narrowing. I was just reading https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/463015-clinical on renal artery aneurysm and it looks like most of the hypertension is actually related to a pre aneurysm stenosis, so i think stenosis is the "better" answer, esp. since the pt has like every risk factor for stenosis. To be honest I had not ever really thought about RAA for this case because bruit over RA has been drilled into my head as renal artery stenosis, but i apprecaite seeing how this is a super reasonable answer - just the stenosis is "more likely" +1  


submitted by lilyo(5),

Anyone have an idea on how to approach this question?

gdupgrant  So the thing i think they tried to catch people on was that the SMV Joins with the splenic to become the portal vein and the IMV feeds into the splenic vein. And they want you to know that cecum is midgut, so drained by the SMV. so my approach was automatically eliminate any answer that included IMV or Splenic vein and that left me with only Ileocolic → superior mesenteric → portal → right hepatic branch of the portal +  


submitted by hello36654(0),

so why is "cessation of fast axonal transport" wrong? Don't myelinated axons, by definition, have fast conductance? So demyelinated axons would have "cessation of fast axonal transport", which is the answer A, right?

diabetes  i think it slows down ,no cessation . +  
gdupgrant  Because fast axonal transport refers to the transport of vesicles containing neurotransmitters or some kind of cell product up and down microtubules in the axon. It isn't related to actual electrical signal transduction. +2