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 +0  (nbme23#16)

so why is "cessation of fast axonal transport" wrong? Don't myelinated axons, by definition, have fast conductance? So demyelinated axons would have "cessation of fast axonal transport", which is the answer A, right?

diabetes  i think it slows down ,no cessation .

 +0  (nbme23#9)

I understand why it's lung now, but I picked thyroid gland because often times thyroid tumors press on the parathyroid sitting above, which causes the parathyroids to secrete more Ca...can someone comment if they've read this too?

paulkarr  I personally have not read that, but I wouldn't be surprised by that fact. I think with these NBME problems though, if you can get the answer within one "step" that should be your choice. Here you can just go Squamous Cell Carcinoma with a direct action on serum calcium levels (via PTHrP). Thyroid requires a few more steps, (assuming your statement is true) so in the eyes of NBME, it ain't gonna be the right choice. Always follow the "KISS" logic!




Subcomments ...

submitted by monkd(5),

Am I crazy or did Uworld not have a question that stated Statins are the most effective drug regardless of baseline lipids. This logic threw my off.

adisdiadochokinetic  You are not crazy. I got this question wrong for the same reason but here's why I think NBME was going with fibrates. You can use the Friedewald equation to calculate LDL cholesterol from the values they give. This equation is LDL= Total Cholesterol-HDL Cholesterol-(Triglycerides/5). The Triglycerides/5 term is an estimate for VLDL. If you calculate it in this case you get an LDL of 120 which is firmly normal and thus the patient would ostensibly not benefit from statin therapy. +5  
hello36654  omg when the hell am I going to remember this equation? Jesuusssssss, this kind of details makes me want to give up on STEP +