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submitted by neonem(571),
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Sodusn leki a ceas of uimFneL-air ermnydso - scien 3p5 si a utrom ouesrssrpp ofr a nbhuc of lcel ytp,se mauotstni ni isht gene s(a ni S)LF eslurt ni a ryiamd fo llmfaiai uomrt yse.tp

pparalpha  Li-Fraunemi syndrome = SBLA (sarcoma, breast, leukemia, adrenal gland syndrome) and occurs because of an autosomal dominant inherited mutation of p53 APC: linked to FAP (colorectal cancer) RET: linked to papillary thyroid cancer, MEN 2A, MEN 2B RB1: retinoblastoma +10  
privatejoker  The thing that threw me off was that the only connection in her FH to the above SBLA reference was the mention of a paternal cousin with adrenocortical carcinoma. The other two mentioned had brain cancers, which seem completely outside the scope of the above mnemonic. Then again, as mentioned elsewhere, I suppose the best policy on these is just to rule out the absolute wrong answers. I swear, the NBME is lying when they tell us to choose the "best" answer on some of these. What they actually mean in practice is for us to choose the least shitty. +15  
dbg  ^ this guy cracked the code. nbme ur doomed. +7  
cienfuegos  @privatejoker: I feel the pain. Quick FYI: UW includes brain in the associated tumors. +3  
hyperfukus  we can just make her thing SBBLA and hopefully never get this wrong again +9  
jakeperalta  @privatejoker: according to UW, Li Fraumeni includes SABBB(sarcoma/adrenocortical/breast/brain/blood(leukemia)) +2  
ac3  side note: RB1 = retinoblastoma with an increased risk of osteosarcoma +  
lukin4answer  TP53 associated with SBLA + Brain tumor + Anaplastic Thyroid ca + Transitional cell ca. -UW +  


submitted by burak(56),
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'Its naleyih ceta,ilgar so we ende the echoso mondoehrcan or oorsdmacrhac.no

-1 I tnhik eetrh are esstmio nad mose roiphcpolme esnhcga ni sdil,e so it' ielk aatgniln.m

-2 oEnanrohsdmc rea dfnou in mllsa obnes fo dnah nad efet iocdnrcga the ,FA utb crsoscardmooahn ear yinaml siader ni muldael fo vlpies or anetrlc sokeetnl.

-3 I roetw no my AF aNsp"eiltco rnehscyooctd in ahliney licgetara tamxir TIWH LALSM AICLTFIACOS.N"CI I o'tdn wkon ewerh it is omrf but bobyrpla UW.

jakeperalta  Lol I've scribbled down the same thing in FA. It's UW. +1  


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ndot' eb a kdi?c tno leayrl seur tawh ermo etrhe is to .it hTe natteip tn'sedo ehva yan rhote liyfma os tsih nowam ohldus eb ecesidonrd iflamy

aesalmon  Questions like this usually hinge on asking if you're going to follow the rules or not though, obviously the one asking her to lie and say she was her sister is wrong, but the correct answer is obviously breaking the hospice center's "policy" - presumably if the physician is sending her to hospice then they don't work there so why would the Dr. be able to just tell her its fine? +5  
hungrybox  Yeah, I got this one wrong with the same logic as you, aesalmon. +1  
emmy2k21  I genuinely interpreted this question as though the two women were in a relationship because of the quotes "my close friend". I figured significant others would be allowed to visit simply. Ha seems like I'm the only one who read too far in between the lines! +8  
dr_jan_itor  @emmy2k21 I also thought the quotes implied a lesbian relationship and that the patient was afraid to share this (they grew up at a time when it was heavily stigmatized). So i was thinking, of course you and your "special friend" can stay together. I know this is not just a phase +8  
et-tu-bromocriptine  Anything particularly wrong with A (Don't worry. I'll call you right away...")? It seemed like the most professional yet considerate answer choice. Are we supposed to imply that they're partners based on those quotation marks around "close friend"? Because otherwise it seems like too casual and less professional than A, almost as if it's breaking policy. +5  
lilmonkey  I can swear that I saw this exact same question in UWORLD before. The only reason I got it right this time. +1  
docshrek  @lilmonkey can you please give the QID for the UWorld question? +2  
jakeperalta  Can someone explain to me why following hospital policy is the wrong answer? I'm so lost.And essentially how is this option any different from the last option where he asks her to say its her sister? Both go against hospital policy. Would greatly appreciate some insight yall. +  
jakeperalta  Can someone explain to me why following hospital policy is the wrong answer? I'm so lost.And essentially how is this option any different from the last option where he asks her to say its her sister? Both go against hospital policy. Would greatly appreciate some insight yall. P.s:it struck me as a romantic relationship as well, but it doesn't clear my doubt😓😭 +1  
drschmoctor  @jakeperalta Following the hospital policy is wrong because it would be cruel and unnecessarily rigid to deny a dying woman the comfort of her closest companion. Also, It would be inappropriate to ask the Pt to lie. What's the point of becoming a doctor if you have to follow some BS corporate policy instead of calling the shots and doing right by your patients? +1  
peridot  Ya kinda dumb that usually NBME usually tells us to never break the rules, yet here it's suddenly ok. But here the reason for this exception is that while only "family" is allowed, a lesbian relationship qualifies the "friend" as family (they just were never officially acknowledged as family/married due to stigma or state laws, which society recognizes today is dumb and outdated). It's a stupid technicality that her significant other isn't allowed to visit as a family member, so while we usually never want to break rules, this scenario follows the "spirit" of the rule. Plus it's a really extreme scenario where the woman is dying and just wants to spend her last moments with her loved one and it would be too cruel to deny someone that. There is no lie involved, which kinda leaves open the chance for the situation to be cleared up if worse comes to worst. This is different from E which is a straight up lie. Hope that helped. +  


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'tdon be a ikc?d not erally sure hatw mroe rhtee is ot .ti Teh apentit e'stodn veah yan ohrte yfmila os iths waonm shlodu be credsionde lyifma

aesalmon  Questions like this usually hinge on asking if you're going to follow the rules or not though, obviously the one asking her to lie and say she was her sister is wrong, but the correct answer is obviously breaking the hospice center's "policy" - presumably if the physician is sending her to hospice then they don't work there so why would the Dr. be able to just tell her its fine? +5  
hungrybox  Yeah, I got this one wrong with the same logic as you, aesalmon. +1  
emmy2k21  I genuinely interpreted this question as though the two women were in a relationship because of the quotes "my close friend". I figured significant others would be allowed to visit simply. Ha seems like I'm the only one who read too far in between the lines! +8  
dr_jan_itor  @emmy2k21 I also thought the quotes implied a lesbian relationship and that the patient was afraid to share this (they grew up at a time when it was heavily stigmatized). So i was thinking, of course you and your "special friend" can stay together. I know this is not just a phase +8  
et-tu-bromocriptine  Anything particularly wrong with A (Don't worry. I'll call you right away...")? It seemed like the most professional yet considerate answer choice. Are we supposed to imply that they're partners based on those quotation marks around "close friend"? Because otherwise it seems like too casual and less professional than A, almost as if it's breaking policy. +5  
lilmonkey  I can swear that I saw this exact same question in UWORLD before. The only reason I got it right this time. +1  
docshrek  @lilmonkey can you please give the QID for the UWorld question? +2  
jakeperalta  Can someone explain to me why following hospital policy is the wrong answer? I'm so lost.And essentially how is this option any different from the last option where he asks her to say its her sister? Both go against hospital policy. Would greatly appreciate some insight yall. +  
jakeperalta  Can someone explain to me why following hospital policy is the wrong answer? I'm so lost.And essentially how is this option any different from the last option where he asks her to say its her sister? Both go against hospital policy. Would greatly appreciate some insight yall. P.s:it struck me as a romantic relationship as well, but it doesn't clear my doubt😓😭 +1  
drschmoctor  @jakeperalta Following the hospital policy is wrong because it would be cruel and unnecessarily rigid to deny a dying woman the comfort of her closest companion. Also, It would be inappropriate to ask the Pt to lie. What's the point of becoming a doctor if you have to follow some BS corporate policy instead of calling the shots and doing right by your patients? +1  
peridot  Ya kinda dumb that usually NBME usually tells us to never break the rules, yet here it's suddenly ok. But here the reason for this exception is that while only "family" is allowed, a lesbian relationship qualifies the "friend" as family (they just were never officially acknowledged as family/married due to stigma or state laws, which society recognizes today is dumb and outdated). It's a stupid technicality that her significant other isn't allowed to visit as a family member, so while we usually never want to break rules, this scenario follows the "spirit" of the rule. Plus it's a really extreme scenario where the woman is dying and just wants to spend her last moments with her loved one and it would be too cruel to deny someone that. There is no lie involved, which kinda leaves open the chance for the situation to be cleared up if worse comes to worst. This is different from E which is a straight up lie. Hope that helped. +  


submitted by tissue creep(113),
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rhdoroptA for re,su tub rof eth ecordr m'I tyrept rseu itsh was nnayCkuughi Vi.rus lyOn tog tish romf a lrdWUo stqineuo as I t'hadn nees ti iunlt enh,t but aprlpnyate the hlarigrtaa is yrlael b,ad hwich si hwat drew em to teh n.wraes

/dtt/nwdkvxht.wg/./w.lpguicucohmhnisyn:cea

meningitis  More like Zika Virus (Same a. aegypti vector) since it says she has rash associated to her bone and muscle pain. I had Zika one time (i live in Puerto Rico). Remember also dengue and Zika are Flavivirus. Dengue can cause hemolysis (hemorrhagic), and Zika is associated with Guillen Barre and fetal abnormalities. +12  
nala_ula  I'm shocked that I found a fellow puerto rican on this site! Good luck on your test! +2  
namira  dont be shocked! me too! exito! +2  
niboonsh  Dengue is also known as "bone break fever" which makes me think its more likely to be dengue due to the "excruciating pains in joints and muscles". https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4242787/ +21  
dr_jan_itor  I was thinking that its Murine typhus transmitted by fleas +  
monique  I would say this is more likely scenario of either Dengue or Chikungunya, not Zika virus. Excruciating pain is common in those, not in Zika. Zika has milder symptoms of those three infection. +2  
jakeperalta  Can confirm that Chikungunya's arthralgia is pretty horrible, from personal experience. +  
almondbreeze  UW: co-infection with chikungunya virus with dengue virus can occure bc Aedes mosquito is a vector of both Chiungunya, dengue, and zika +  
lovebug  FA2019, page 167 RNA virusesy. +  
lovebug  Found that Chikungunya also have Rash./// An erythematous macular or maculopapular rash usually appears in the first 2–3 days of the illness and subsides within 7–10 days. It can be patchy or diffuse on the face, trunk and limbs. It is typically asymptomatic but may be pruritic (Taubitz W, Cramer JP, Kapaun A, et al. Chikungunya fever in travelers: clinical presentation and course. Clin Infect Dis. 2007; 45: e1. ) +1  
beto  it is chikungunya->fever, polyarthralgia, diffuse macular rash, dengue has retro-orbital pain mostly +1