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Comments ...

 +0  (nbme23#22)

it is normal irradiation to the RIGHT neck? what does it mean?


 +2  (nbme21#13)

well...in FA2018 said misoprostol increase production of GASTRIC mucosa and the question said ESOPHAGUS mucosa....maaaay be is that reason

champagnesupernova3  Reducing acid production helps mucosa heal alot more than increasing prostaglandins. We learn about misoprostol because it can be used if you dont have anything else but you're never gonna choose it over a PPI




Subcomments ...

submitted by monoloco(53),

Anyone else figure out how a surgeon gets his hand inside the patient deep enough to avulse the hepatic veins from the IVC during a LAPAROTOMY? Baffles me.

mesoform  I think this one was pretty easy if you just know the regional anatomy. That was the only answer choice that could remotely have that presentation, so I think it was just testing your knowledge of the structures listed relative to the description. +1  
kimcharito  aorta is also behind of liver... +1  


submitted by liltr(11),

I choose MVP too, but this patient’s main symptom is cough only during exercise. This is more indicative of exercised associated asthma. You could see shortness of breath in MVP during exercise, but choosing MVP leaves the cough unaccounted for.

.ooo.   I agree! Also, At the end of the stem, the question is which of the following best explain the patients symptoms? Not physical exam findings. Since this patient is coming in with a chief complaint of SOB while playing sports exercise induced asthma is the best choice. Hopefully that helps. +6  
uslme123  I mean... couldn't increased BP during exercise worsen his MVP and give him SOB? +  
uslme123  (by causing slight regurg) +1  
yotsubato  "Lungs are clear to auscultation" +3  
sahusema  But wouldn't choosing exercise-induced asthma leave the murmur unaccounted for? +  
cienfuegos  I incorrectly chose malingering and am wondering if the fact that he presented (although it doesn't state who brought him in/confirmed his symptoms while exercising) makes this less likely despite the fact that he clearly states "I don't want to play anymore" which could be interpreted as a secondary gain? Also, regarding the MVP, I'm wondering if the fact that these are usually benign should have factored into our decision to rule it out? Thoughts? +1  
cienfuegos  Just noticed that he has FHx, game changer. +  
kimcharito  clear lungs, they try to say no cardiogenic Pulm. edema, means is not due to MVP shortness of breath while doing sports and no shortness at rest makes me to think more asthma induced by exercise) +  


submitted by hayayah(398),

Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Don't have to be an alcoholic to get this, just usually is related to alcoholism / thiamine deficiency.

d_holles  Yeah the negative EtOH screen threw me off +1  
dr_jan_itor  Why cant it be early alzheimers and hippocampus? She could easily have been a former prominent physician and member of city council. Am i supposed to assume that simply because shes disheveled and poor hygeine that she must be an alcoholic homeless person? It also mentions no symptoms of nystagmus, ataxia, etc. +1  
kimcharito  it said broad based gait and nystagmus +1  


Autoimmune thyroiditis (aka Hashimoto) + pregnant--> Think about possibility of fetal hypothyroidism due to antibody mediated maternal hypothyroidism. Leads to Cretinism. Findings in infant are the 6'P (Pot belly, Pale, Puffy face, Protruding umbilicus, Protuberant tongue, and Poor Brain development.

neonem  I don't understand the last part of this question stem though... if the mother's TSH *increases* during pregnancy? Wouldn't this further increase her (and/or the fetus's) production of T4 and thus counteract the hypothyroidism? +  
poojaym  @neonem no. Autoimmune hypothyroidism is a destruction of the thyroid gland, and a decrease in production of T3/T4. An increase in TSH means that there is not enough T3/T4 to inhibit TRH, and so TSH is being released to stimulate the thyroid gland. +3  
arezpr  TSH, T3, T4 and thyroglobulin cannot cross the placental barrier. +  
chamaleo  @arezpr although those hormones can't cross, the autoantibodies from Hashimoto's can +  
yotsubato  The baby has its own TSH though +  
sbryant6  TSH comes from the pituitary, and act on the thyroid. Autoantibodies attack the thyroid, so TSH doesn't work. +  
kimcharito  no goiter then? +