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Fibronectin is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein, while lamin is an intermediate filament that specifically provides support to the cell nucleus. Don’t confuse lamin with laminin (science hates us clearly); laminin is like fibronectin, an ECM glycoprotein and a major component of the basal lamina of basement membranes.

masonkingcobra  Lamin looks like a "cross" and held up Jesus and the basal lamina is super important just like jesus (you bet there are people who believe this) https://answersingenesis.org/biology/microbiology/laminin-and-the-cross/ +7  
dr.xx  blasphemy @masonkingcobra +  
luciana  I clearly confused lamin with laminin, now I know +1  
almondbreeze  FA 2019 pg 48 lamin +  
almondbreeze  picked tubulin but i guess tubulin makes up microtubules and therefore is spherical +  


So we are just supposed to know that poodles are hypoallergenic...

I put "get an air cleaner" because I thought asking the roommate to stop smoking would be beyond the scope of the physician and since I didnt know poodles were hypoallergenic, I thought "well, even if the roommate stopped smoking, she'll still have issues because of the pet dander."

cries

luciana  Same here, I got confused because it seemed that the smoke AND the dog were the triggers, so I picked "Move back to the dormitories" so all the triggers would be gone. Who would imagine poodles were hypoallergenic +  
luciana  For those like me who didn't know there was 1 hypoallergenic dog, there are 23 to you memorize :) https://blog.homesalive.ca/dogs-that-dont-shed-23-hypoallergenic-dog-breeds +  


So we are just supposed to know that poodles are hypoallergenic...

I put "get an air cleaner" because I thought asking the roommate to stop smoking would be beyond the scope of the physician and since I didnt know poodles were hypoallergenic, I thought "well, even if the roommate stopped smoking, she'll still have issues because of the pet dander."

cries

luciana  Same here, I got confused because it seemed that the smoke AND the dog were the triggers, so I picked "Move back to the dormitories" so all the triggers would be gone. Who would imagine poodles were hypoallergenic +  
luciana  For those like me who didn't know there was 1 hypoallergenic dog, there are 23 to you memorize :) https://blog.homesalive.ca/dogs-that-dont-shed-23-hypoallergenic-dog-breeds +  


luciana  https://basicmedicalkey.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/B9780443066849500846_gr6.jpg Specific image link :) good view of the 3 arteries +  


submitted by m-ice(182),

The patient shows no sign of cortical activity, but has some brainstem function intact, which implies she is in a form of persistent vegetative state. She has a living will that designates mechanical ventilation should be discontinued if that situation arises, so we must follow it and make not attempt to resuscitate.

lfsuarez  Why would the second part of that be correct when there is not mention of a DNR? +7  
ug123  DNI and DNR are different right? This patient had a DNI. Why would we assume it to be DNR too? +1  
sherry  DNI and DNR are indeed different. But it is not the case here. The patient needs to be extubated means she did not sign a DNI or DNR in the first place. I assume her living will is more like terminate supporting treatment in a vegetative state. So there is no need to do resuscitation anyways. But I agree this is not a good question. +  
shayan  "The patient has signed the living will and is consistent with her directives" but the stem doesnt tell has what is in her living will about the extubation? we are extubating on the request of her husband? this is confusing ! +3  
criovoly  I believe this question was not well constructed... it's one of those! +  
suckitnbme  @shayan extubating at request of the husband because he's following what's in her living will. Following that line of thought, the patient probably wanted withdrawal of care if in a vegetative state. +  
luciana  I understood same as @shayan that she wanted to keep intubated... now reading it again I feel extra dumb with my poor reading interpretation skills +  


submitted by majic(3),

THE MOST COMMON route of Toxo transmission in adults in the USA is ingestion of undercooked pork. Even if cat litter is an option, undercooked pork is still more common.

yotsubato  Also another fun fact. Most people in France are infected by Toxo (like 80%) because of how they eat meat. (Very rare) +1  
madojo  To add on might be TMI but most people have Toxo but are asymptomatic because its in its latent form as a pseudocyst and its not untill you are immunocompromised that it strikes +  
suckitnbme  This patient also probably got toxo in Brazil +  
luciana  JFYI people in Brazil love to eat rare meat at barbecues +  


submitted by medstudied(2),

Can someone explain why the correct answer for the question here is conjugation but can’t be transposition?

catacholamine16  Transposition is when a segment of DNA (in this case, coding for resistance) jumps onto a plasmid within the same bacterial cell. That plasmid might then transfer to another nearby bacterial cell via conjugation. Transposition is happening WITHIN the bacterium. Conjugation is how that resistance gene gets transferred. +5  
lsmarshall  Also, E. coli is the classic example of a bug tat uses conjugation. ^but explanation above is correct^ +2  
seagull  I think he might have did what I did. I got Transformation mixed up with transposition. FML +2  
luciana  I still can't understand why it can't be transduction. Is it just because of bacterial types? +  
thotcandy  @luciana Yes, I believe so. You have to remember which bacteria have a conjugation pilus - E. coli is the most popular one because of its F sex factor (remember the F+ x F0 thing in FA?) +  


CNS amoebiasis is most notoriously caused by Naegleria fowleri, which I encourage you to memorize as the “brain-eating amoeba.” Found in fresh-water bodies of water like ponds and lakes, it has three forms: a cyst, a trophozoite (ameboid), and a biflagellate (i.e. has two flagella). Infection is via olfactory cell axons through the cribriform plate to the brain.

mullerplouis  To add to this it causes Meningoencephalitis. Look out for confusion and brain signs mixed with signs of meningitis. Only a handful of organisms that cause both. +1  
osler_weber_rendu  Am I the only one who thought portal of entry cant be through a nerve and just ignored all the nerves? +4  
luciana  @osler_weber_rendu I thought the same... I knew it was through cribriform plate, but not that was actually through the nerve +1  


As always, it’s almost better to ignore the pictures when possible. This gentleman has a peptic ulcer, which we know is caused predominately by H. pylori infection. H. pylori produces proteases and particularly urease, which allow it to increase the pH of its local environment by cleaving urea into ammonia, which is toxic to gastric mucosa. The picture demonstrates H pylori, which are evident with silver staining.

joonam  Hey bro, thank you so much for your contributions on these free 120 questions. Your advice on test taking strategies for step 1 have been very helpful. +10  
luciana  "Elaborated enzymes by H. pylori may also contribute directly to epithelial cell injury. Ammonia produced through urease activity may be toxic to gastric epithelial cells. H. pylori protease and lipase degrade gastric mucus and disrupt the phospholipid-rich layer at the apical epithelial cell surface, allowing for cell injury from back diffusion of gastric acid." https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9394757 +1  
luciana  I got tricked :( Thought the damage was due to destruction of local somatostatin cells with increased gastrin and acid production... but this is actually the mechanism of duodenal ulcers development related to H. pylori But makes sense, so thats how the somatostatin producing cells are destroyed lol +1  


As always, it’s almost better to ignore the pictures when possible. This gentleman has a peptic ulcer, which we know is caused predominately by H. pylori infection. H. pylori produces proteases and particularly urease, which allow it to increase the pH of its local environment by cleaving urea into ammonia, which is toxic to gastric mucosa. The picture demonstrates H pylori, which are evident with silver staining.

joonam  Hey bro, thank you so much for your contributions on these free 120 questions. Your advice on test taking strategies for step 1 have been very helpful. +10  
luciana  "Elaborated enzymes by H. pylori may also contribute directly to epithelial cell injury. Ammonia produced through urease activity may be toxic to gastric epithelial cells. H. pylori protease and lipase degrade gastric mucus and disrupt the phospholipid-rich layer at the apical epithelial cell surface, allowing for cell injury from back diffusion of gastric acid." https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9394757 +1  
luciana  I got tricked :( Thought the damage was due to destruction of local somatostatin cells with increased gastrin and acid production... but this is actually the mechanism of duodenal ulcers development related to H. pylori But makes sense, so thats how the somatostatin producing cells are destroyed lol +1  


luciana  "Sjogren syndrome likely results from a combination of genetic and environmental factors (it appears to be multifactorial). Several different genes appear to affect the risk of developing the condition, but specific genes have not been confirmed. Simply having one of these genes does not cause a person to develop the disease. " From the article cited +1