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Welcome to step1forthewin’s page.
Contributor score: 2


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 +1  (nbme24#5)
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xxabi  I'm not completely sure...but I think its because its aspirin, and aspirin doesn't work on IIb/IIIa receptors. That's why i picked decreased adherence of platelets, figured that was the closest thing to decreased aggregation that still made sense with aspirin's mechanism of action. Hope that helps! +2
ihavenolife  Aspirin irreversibly inhibits COX which leads to decreased TXA2. TXA2 normally is a vasoconstrictor and induces platelet aggregation, so aspirin inhibits platelet aggregation by downplaying TXA2 not by interacting with IIb/IIIa receptor. (Source FA and UWorld) +21
fallenistand  In this case, inhibition of COX-1 by aspirin will also reduce the amount of precursors for vascular prostacyclin synthesis, provided, for example, from adhering platelets https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9263351 +1
niboonsh  inhibition of IIb/IIIa receptor is the moa of a completely separate class of drugs - Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (abciximab, eptifabide, tirofiban) +1
t123  Bad question - TXA2 upregulates GpIIb/IIIa on platelets. So aspirin inhibits their expression. +1




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lispectedwumbologist  Nevermind I'm stupid as fuck I see my mistake +1  
drdoom  be kind to yourself, doc! (it's a long road we're on!) +20  
step1forthewin  Hi, can someone explain the blood smear? isn't it supposed to show hypersegmented neutrophils if it was B12 deficiency? +1  
loftybirdman  I think the blood smear is showing a lone lymphocyte, which should be the same size as a normal RBC. You can see the RBCs in this smear are bigger than that ->macrocytic ->B12 deficiency +22  
seagull  maybe i'm new to the game. but isn't the answer folate deficiency and not B12? Also, i though it was anemia of chronic disease as well. +  
vshummy  Lispectedwumbologist, please explain your mistake? Lol because that seems like a respectible answer to me... +9  
gonyyong  It's a B12 deficiency Ileum is where B12 is reabsorbed, folate is jejunum The blood smear is showing enlarged RBCs Methionine synthase does this conversion, using cofactor B12 +  
uslme123  Anemia of chronic disease is a microcytic anemia -- I believe this is why they put a lymphocyte on the side -- so we could see that it was a macrocytic anemia. +2  
yotsubato  Thanks NBME, that really helped me.... +1  
keshvi  the question was relatively easy, but the picture was so misguiding i felt! i thought it looked like microcytic RBCs. I guess the key is, that they clearly mentioned distal ileum. and that is THE site for B12 absorption. +6  
sahusema  I didn't even register that was a lymphocyte. I thought I was seeing target cells so I was confused AF +  
drschmoctor  Leave it to NBME to find the palest macrocytes on the planet. +4  
zevvyt  so i guess size is more important than color cause those are hypochromatic as fuck +