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Comments ...

 +1  (nbme24#5)

Can someone please clarify the answer. Is decreased adherence same as decreased aggregation? Wouldn;t inhibition of the IIb/IIIa receptor prevent aggregation?

xxabi  I'm not completely sure...but I think its because its aspirin, and aspirin doesn't work on IIb/IIIa receptors. That's why i picked decreased adherence of platelets, figured that was the closest thing to decreased aggregation that still made sense with aspirin's mechanism of action. Hope that helps!
ihavenolife  Aspirin irreversibly inhibits COX which leads to decreased TXA2. TXA2 normally is a vasoconstrictor and induces platelet aggregation, so aspirin inhibits platelet aggregation by downplaying TXA2 not by interacting with IIb/IIIa receptor. (Source FA and UWorld)
fallenistand  In this case, inhibition of COX-1 by aspirin will also reduce the amount of precursors for vascular prostacyclin synthesis, provided, for example, from adhering platelets https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9263351




Subcomments ...

Why would it not be anemia of chronic disease with decreased serum transferrin concentration?

lispectedwumbologist  Nevermind I'm stupid as fuck I see my mistake +  
drdoom  be kind to yourself, doc! (it's a long road we're on!) +7  
step1forthewin  Hi, can someone explain the blood smear? isn't it supposed to show hypersegmented neutrophils if it was B12 deficiency? +  
loftybirdman  I think the blood smear is showing a lone lymphocyte, which should be the same size as a normal RBC. You can see the RBCs in this smear are bigger than that ->macrocytic ->B12 deficiency +8  
seagull  maybe i'm new to the game. but isn't the answer folate deficiency and not B12? Also, i though it was anemia of chronic disease as well. +  
vshummy  Lispectedwumbologist, please explain your mistake? Lol because that seems like a respectible answer to me... +  
gonyyong  It's a B12 deficiency Ileum is where B12 is reabsorbed, folate is jejunum The blood smear is showing enlarged RBCs Methionine synthase does this conversion, using cofactor B12 +  
uslme123  Anemia of chronic disease is a microcytic anemia -- I believe this is why they put a lymphocyte on the side -- so we could see that it was a macrocytic anemia. +  
yotsubato  Thanks NBME, that really helped me.... +  
keshvi  the question was relatively easy, but the picture was so misguiding i felt! i thought it looked like microcytic RBCs. I guess the key is, that they clearly mentioned distal ileum. and that is THE site for B12 absorption. +2  
sahusema  I didn't even register that was a lymphocyte. I thought I was seeing target cells so I was confused AF +