and we’re back! with BRAND SPANKIN' NEW tangents!
welcome redditors!to snoo-finity ... and beyond!
Welcome to tsl19's page.
Contributor score: 10
School:


Comments ...




Subcomments ...

submitted by tinydoc(46),

infarcts would be a more peripheral wedge shape

abcess wouldnt be invasive to the surrounding area i think.

squamous cell is more centrally located

wasn't 100% sure but thats the best answer slthough stupid to give 0 symptoms and just a picture, nothing like an actual clinical scenario

tsl19  Squamous cell is centrally located and has cavitation, which you can see in the pic. Similar to this one: https://webpath.med.utah.edu/LUNGHTML/LUNG068.html +1  


submitted by calcium196(7),

Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis is not reversibly affected by insulin. The question asks for reversible ways that insulin affects it, and ubiquitination would lead to degradation via proteases, which is not reversible. Nuclear/cytoplasmic shunting makes sense because FOXO is a transcription factor, so it can’t do its job if it is in the cytoplasm!

meningitis  Thank you for your explanation! One question: How about the serine phosphorylation? Is it answered by pure memorization that the FOXO TF is serine phosphorylated, or is it a general fact that all TF's are serine-threonine phosphorylated? +  
tsl19  I'm not sure, but it may be as simple as this: ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis is irreversible, but both N/C shuttling and phosphorylation are generally reversible processes. +  
didelphus  I also guessed that FOXO must be a part of the PI3K pathway, since insulin regulates metabolism through PI3K and the question stem specifically mentions that. Phosphorylation is a major part of that pathway, so even indirectly phosphorylation would regulate FOXO. Frustrating question. +4  
niboonsh  yes, FOXO is affected downstream of the activation of PI3K. This is a really good video that explains the whole cascade https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewgLd9N3s-4 +  
alexb  According to wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FOXO1) phosphorylation of FOXO1 is irreversible. This is referring to phosphorylation of serine residues on FOXO by Akt, which occurs in response to insulin. But the NBME answer suggests it's reversible. What's up? +  


submitted by taway(7),

Does anybody understand why we are allowed to interfere with the clinical decisionmaking of two other specialists directly? Wouldn't that muddy the waters even more by adding our opinion? I don't see the underlying principle that explains the rationale in this answer.

jcrll  I think it's about adding our opinion and more about seeing what the situation is because a patient contacted you in distress. The others are about contacting management off hearsay; that could also "muddy the waters," I Is this question also addressing quaternary prevention? +1  
meningitis  I agree with jcrll. My same thought process but then I changed it to psychiatric consultation in order to first attend the patient's distress and anxiety since it was hindering her decision making. Besides, the whole ordeal about her treatments and ineffectiveness was emotionally and physically exhausting her. +2  
vi_capsule  Referral is NEVER a answer +4  
tsl19  Going straight to the chair of the ethics committee without having spoken to the other physicians would be inappropriate because it would be jumping a bunch of steps in communication first - like jcrll said, you want to get the picture of what's going on from the other physicians first. Maybe the gynecologic oncologist isn't actually as opposed to palliative measures as the patient perceives him to be and thinks he's doing what the patient wants, etc. It could just be miscommunication, which you could help clear up without getting ethics involved ... better to start there. +2  


My thought process was that post-partum bleeding is usually related to the uterus, and much of the pelvic viscera is supplied by branches of the internal iliac artery.

neonem  This sounds like a case of acute endometritis. In any case, uterus is supplied by uterine artery (branch of internal iliac artery) with collateral flow from ovarian artery (comes right off aorta). I don't think there are any branches of external iliac artery into the pelvis; it becomes femoral artery once it passes under inguinal ligament. +2  
tsl19  Here's a picture that I found helpful [Female Reproductive Tract arterial supply] (https://teachmeanatomy.info/wp-content/uploads/Blood-Supply-to-Female-Reproductive-Tract.jpg) +7  
sympathetikey  @tsl - Thank you! +  


the infarct occurred 16 hrs ago, from 12-24hrs after the infarct there will be Red Neurons.

tsl19  FA 2018 - p. 496: ischemia -> pyknosis within 12-24 hours. +  
d_holles  yeah the infarct occurring 16 hr ago is key. i zoomed in only on the died 1 hr later +