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NBME 18 Answers

nbme18/Block 2/Question#6 (3.1 difficulty score)
A 17-year-old boy is brought to the physician ...
"Tell me more about your concerns about your son's height."🔍
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 +1 
submitted by azibird(92),

What is going on here? The mother is not the patient, why are we exploring this further when the son is completely normal? I get it that we would say this if the patient were concerned, but he's not and he's normal so why don't we just tell her that everything is normal? Exploring further will probably make the patient feel worse.

drdoom  Another way to read the stem is like this: “Assume you will make a statement that assures mom that boy is fine. What other statement do you want to make?” Since we’re *already* assuring mom, the best next thing is to ask an open-ended question. There’s a reason for this. As a physician, you really don’t want to say more than what you are (1) sure of or (2) obliged to. “Accept him as he is” = judgy. “He’s not going to get any taller” = you don’t know this for sure. +  



 +1 
submitted by drdoom(681),

Responding to @azibird’s comment:

Another way to read the stem is like this: “Assume you will make a statement that assures mom that boy is fine. What other statement do you want to make?”

Since we’re *already* assuring mom, the best next thing is to ask an open-ended question. There’s a reason for this. As a physician, you really don’t want to say more than what you are (1) sure of or (2) obliged to.

“Accept him as he is” = judgy.

“He’s not going to get any taller” = you don’t know this for sure.